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ITV’s Victoria reigns over BBC’s Are You Being Served? and Porridge revivals

Jenna Coleman as Queen Victoria (left) and Sherrie Hewson as Mrs SlocombeImage copyright
ITV/BBC

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Jenna Coleman as Queen Victoria (left) was adult opposite Sherrie Hewson as Mrs Slocombe

Queen Victoria has beaten Mrs Slocombe to a TV ratings climax as ITV’s new royal play drew some-more viewers than BBC One’s reconstruction of classical sitcom Are You Being Served? on Sunday.

Overnight total showed an normal of 5.4 million people watched Jenna Coleman in Victoria, incompatible +1.

Are You Being Served?, in that Sherrie Hewson donned Mrs Slocombe’s pinkish wig, was seen by 5 million viewers.

It was followed by an updated Porridge, that captivated 4.4 million.

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Jason Watkins’ opening as Mr Humphries divided opinion

‘A pompous half-hour’

The new versions of Are You Being Served? and Porridge are partial of a deteriorate of BBC programmes to symbol a 60th anniversary of a birth of a TV sitcom.

Are You Being Served? creatively ran from 1972 to 1985. The one-off new part was set in 1988.

Loose Women star Hewson played Mrs Slocombe, a impression done famous by Molly Sugden, and Bafta Award leader Jason Watkins starred as Mr Humphries, creatively played by John Inman.

But a uncover was described as a “turgid, perpetual half-hour” by a Daily Telegraph’s TV censor Michael Hogan.

‘A energetic one-off homage’

It had a “lazy faith on lavatorial humour and infrequent misogyny”, he wrote, with Watkins’ opening “the biggest misfire”.

“Watkins is a excellent actor, yet here he was doing a toe-curling reverence act, cartoonishly stay and straining too tough for laughs. It done one conclude Inman’s iconic description even more.”

The Times’ James Jackson was kinder on Watkins. He wrote: “You could pardon him for hidden a show, given a genuine crime here was a uncover itself.”

The Guardian’s Stuart Jeffries described it as “a energetic one-off homage”, yet added: “Thank heavens it’s usually a one-off, though.”

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Kevin Bishop played Norman Stanley Fletcher’s grandson Nigel in Porridge

The new chronicle of Porridge, meanwhile, was created by Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais, who were behind a original.

Sunday’s part was set in a benefaction day and featured Kevin Bishop as a grandson of Norman Stanley Fletcher, famously played by Ronnie Barker in a 1970s. It got a somewhat improved reception.

The Telegraph’s Michael Hogan wrote: “If one of final night’s one-off revivals is to get a full array – and temperament in mind a new ratings success of Still Open All Hours, we strongly think that is a BBC’s goal – I’d most rather it was this one.

“Porridge left me with an indulgent laugh on my face, rather than an Are You Being Served? cringe.”

X Factor’s total drop

Earlier, ITV’s The X Factor narrowly kick BBC One’s Antiques Roadshow in a timeslot.

The second complement of a talent show’s 13th array was seen by 5.7 million people on ITV during 20:00 BST on Sunday – not including +1 and catch-up.

Antiques Roadshow pulled in 5.6 million, while a final of Robot Wars on BBC Two – that saw Dave Young, Marc Dermott and Ben Bacon delight with Apollo – was watched by 1.4 million.

The ratings for X Factor’s second part were down on a 6.3 million who had tuned in for a initial complement on Saturday night.


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Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-37213042